Q&A

The Family Care Giver Thinks…

How do I get help for my loved one?
Aging Life Care™ Managers have the expertise to know community resources, recognize the needs of the older adult, understand family dynamics, and the ability to work with family members to attain positive outcomes.

I feel overwhelmed trying to meet the needs of my parents, my children, and my job. How can I get it all done?
Adult children are busy with their own jobs and lives. Aging Life Care Managers can assume some of these burdens, working in partnership with the family … all play a part! Aging Life Care managers can take partial or full responsibility for managing the home as well as the care.

How can I get my siblings to understand that our parents need help?
It is difficult for family members to see the gradually increasing needs of their aging parents.
Aging Life Care Managers provide an unbiased source of information and open up family communication. ALCM also hold family conferences to assist all members in arriving at best possible approaches towards helping the aging parent(s).

Should I have them move closer?
“Family” living close by doesn’t always provide the solution. Parents may not want to leave their church and friends and familiar surroundings. Aging Life Care Managers can oversee care of loved ones to assist family members who live at a distance.

What do they want?
If they want to stay home, we can talk about what options are available to make this possible. If not possible to remain at home, Aging Life Care Managers can assist with transitions to other settings.

The Parent Thinks…

We’re getting older but want to manage our own lives. At what point do we ask for help?
Aging Life Care Managers focus on maintaining the well-being, independence, and dignity of elders.

Our children want to be supportive.
They may be uncomfortable talking about end of life issues and long-term care plans. Often, a capable third-party can help get this vital conversation underway!

We can do it ourselves (Not really!). We’re physically able to maintain our home, manage our medications, understand complicated financial reports, and drive our car (Oh!?)…
Aging Life Care Managers help with these difficult interventions and denial of reality by the older adult, and often, by some members of the family, as well.

We want to stay at home as long as possible.
Seniors often receive home care services as physical capabilities diminish. In-home care is appropriate when a person needs ongoing care that cannot be provided by family and friends, and the person prefers (and can afford) to stay at home. Aging Life Care Managers can help elderly people adapt to changing needs with household modifications, medical equipment, medication reminders, and other devices that assist with safety and abilities. Aging Life Care Managers can assist with helping seniors to understand that adding some hours of caregiver assistance can help people meet their goals of staying home safely.

Helpful Resources

We are not endorsing any of below websites; these sites may be useful to you.

www.westerngcm.org

www.aginglifecare.org

www.alz.org

www.medicare.gov/nhcompare

www.goldviolin.com

www.buckandbuck.com